BEHIND THE CRAFT
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Tea Craft: Where is Tea grown?

Most tea producing countries are found in a tropical belt around the equator, the finest teas are found at altitudes between 4000 and 6000 ft [‘high grown’], where mist and cloud protect the plants and allows a slower development and consequently, more flavour.

Whilst the majority of tea comes from countries like China, India, Sri Lanka, Vietnam, Kenya and Japan, there are some new surprising origins. Tea is now successfully grown in New Zealand and Scotland for example. Indeed, a tea bush can be grown very successfully in your home with a little TLC.

Find out more about how tea is grown.

FGTE13189

Da Hong Pao Oolong Tea Pouch 50g

Net Weight: 100g

This is a prestigious and luxury variety of Wuyi Oolong tea. When brewed this beautiful red full-bodied cup gives a roasted flavour and aroma with delicate floral notes.

The East India Company - Lifestyle

Food and Beverages

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£30.00
One of the world's special teas.

Da Hong Pao or 'Big Red Robe' is a type of Wuyi tea grown in the Wuyi Mountains of northern Fujian Province, China. The Wuyi teas are prized due to the age of the tea bushes in this distinctive terroir, and are some of the most costly teas in the world, especially when harvested from the original tea trees.

It's thought that the Wuyi Mountains are likely to be the home of oolong teas.
Da Hong Pao is a dark, well-oxidised oolong and the key additional processing step after withering, is also key to its flavour profile. The withered tea is shaken and rolled in a large bamboo sieve which likely speeds the oxidation.

To read more about oolong teas and how they are made, see our Stories section below.
Because of the hand-rolling and twisting during the unique processing of this tea, the leaf shape is like a tightly knotted rope and is green and brown in colour.

The liquor is bright, clear and orangey-red in colour.

A unique orchid-like fragrance, and a long-lasting toasty, sweet aftertaste.

Da Hong Pao can be used for multiple steepings, such is the extent of the flavour.
Quantity

2 GRAMS OF TEA LEAVES PER CUP

Temperature

200ML OF WATER AT 85ºC

Brewing Time

3 MINS BREWING TIME

Ingredients

Oolong Tea

Storage

Store in a cool, dry place avoiding direct sunlight and strong odours.

Stories

Oolong Tea – Between a Black and a Green Tea

Just like all the other teas [apart from White Tea], it starts with a small ‘just-plucked’ green tea leaf, usually about 5 cm long. The pickers deliver their freshly-picked leaves to the local factory for processing.

Oolongs are made mainly in China and Taiwan and sit somewhere between Black and Green Tea by virtue of being partly oxidised. A dark, open-leaf Oolong Tea is 70% oxidised, whilst the greener Oolongs are only 30% oxidised and are rolled into ball-shapes.

Step 1 - ‘Withering’: the whole leaves are spread out in the warm sun and then brought inside to be laid on bamboo shelves.

Step 2 - Partial Oxidation: the whole leaves are turned and shaken every couple of hours. This breaks the cell walls, releasing the enzymes, starting the oxidation process.
Depending on whether a dark open leaf oolong or a balled green oolong is being made, the process is slightly different:


Step 3 Dark Oolong - ‘Firing: Once oxidation has hit 70%, the tea is quickly pan fried to stop oxidation and then completely dried in ovens, ready to be packed.

Step 3 Green Oolong - ‘Firing’: Once oxidation has hit 30%, the tea is quickly pan fried to prevent further oxidation, followed by partial drying in an oven, before being left overnight.


Step 4 Green Oolong – ‘Balling’: The following day, the Oolong Tea in waiting is tightly bagged in cloth and rolled in a machine that will pressurise and bruise the leaves inside. The bag gets opened out and then wrapped up again. This is repeated over and over, until the leaf is in the ‘correct’ ball shape. Complete drying follows and the tea is ready to be packed.

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  • FAQ

    Does oolong tea contain caffeine and is there more or less than black and green tea and coffee?
    Yes it does, and it varies. All tea leaves, just like coffee, contain caffeine. Tea usually has a lower level of caffeine than coffee, which averages around 95mg for a normal cup of coffee. But it is impossible to give a precise answer, because there are so many variables at play - the length of brew time, the amount of tea used, the age of the leaf, the provenance of the leaf. Even the temperature of the water. Our best advice is to treat all tea and coffee similarly if you need to manage your caffeine intake.

    I’ve heard that tea contains theanine. What is it and what does it do?
    Tea does indeed contain theanine, which is an amino acid [the building blocks of proteins]. Tea is one of only a few sources of theanine. It represents about 1% of dry weight and is at its highest concentrate in shade-grown teas like matcha and gyokuro. Whilst not yet proven in scientific studies that would permit specific health claims to be made, it is believed by many to be able to reduce mental and physical stress, promote relaxation and a sense of well-being. But not only that, it is more recently being thought to aid cognitive function. It’s one explanation for tea’s famous ability to create calm in a crisis [the Great British solution to all problems – ‘putting the kettle on’] and to stimulate when a little boost is required.

  • Delivery & Returns

    UK Standard Delivery: £3.95
    UK Next Day Delivery (mainland UK only): £9.95 (Order before 12pm)
    International Delivery is available, please see our delivery page for details. For more information and Terms & Conditions, please see our Delivery page.

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