BEHIND THE CRAFT
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Caffeine-Free

Caffeine-free - it’s a key reason why the western world drinks infusions.

But what is caffeine and why should we be caffeine-free sometimes instead of supercharging?

It's an organic compound. It stimulates the CNS, a cognitive enhancer in fact [& why students drink more coffee at exams]. Proven to enhance physical performance too. But many can correlate insomnia with caffeine taken too late in the day and too much is considered bad for the health.

Here’s a fascinating thing - caffeine's feisty role in nature is unsurprisingly brilliant too - it’s found in leaves, nuts [e.g. cola], seeds and fruits. Why? It can protect a nut from being eaten by a predator. Persuade a bee to pollinate. Stop a competing plant from germinating.

Reason enough to try caffeine-free!

FGTE12236

Spiced Rooibos Leaf Herbal Infusion Caddy 50g

Net Weight: 50g

A delightful caffeine-free blend of nutty rooibos and exotic natural ingredients, delivering a spicy and fruity warming infusion. All in a delightful Limited Edition red mini caddy from our seasonal Kaleidoscope range.

The East India Company - Lifestyle

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£14.00
Get the taste of Christmas in your cup with this Rooibos spicy and fruit fusion blend. The nutty medium-bodied taste of rooibos is mixed with the orange peel, cloves, Star Anise, Cranberry and Cinnamon take control to envelop you in their warming properties. A credible infusion alternative for those wanting to stay naturally caffeine free.
Quantity

2.5 GRAMS OF TEA LEAVES | 1 TEASPOON

Temperature

200ML OF WATER AT 85ºC

Brewing Time

4-5 MINS BREWING TIME

Ingredients

Rooibos (63%), Star Anise (10%), Orange Peel (10%), Cranberry Pieces (10%), Cinnamon (3%), Clove (2%), Natural Cranberry Flavour (1%), Cinnamon Leaf Oil (1%)

Nutrition

Typical values 100g – Energy: 0kj/0kcal | Fat: 0g, of which saturates: 0g | Carbohydrate: 0g, of which sugars: 0g | Protein: 0g | Salt 0g

Storage

Store in a cool, dry place avoiding direct sunlight and strong odours.

Stories

Spice and Trade

Spices and the spice trade have been an enormous influence in global political, social, and economic developments for over 1000 years.

They were considered by those without as rare and valuable, prized for their preservative, medicinal and aromatic qualities. The East India Company realized the opportunity, but it arrived late to the game.

The Arabs in the Near-East dominated the spice trade and then the Portuguese trading in India, the Far-East and the Spice Islands [the modern-day Moluccas of Indonesia).

Of course, not all spices came from the Far-East - the Portuguese had brought chilli peppers from South America to their Indian colonies in the 16th century, which became a part of Indian cuisine and their richly spiced foods.

Captured Portuguese ships full of spice from the Spice Islands whet the appetite for the British, but it was the Dutch that made the first move, sending well-funded fleets to the Spice Islands in the 1590s, using navigational maps stolen from the Portuguese. By quickly establishing trade and being well organised and armed, the Dutch cut off the English, in the form of the East India Company, to the spice trade, who were forced to trade in the surrounding islands.
There was one nutmeg of consolation for the British. Polo Run, which was the only nutmeg-producing portion of the Spice Islands, fell into the Company’s hands from the Dutch in 1616.

The British stumbled upon the opportunity to trade in pepper in Bantam [Java], setting up a ‘factory’ [a fortified warehouse], and there was enough for all to avoid fisticuffs. The East India Company would continue to trade in pepper up to the 19th century.

When the Company arrived in India and started trading, its botanists were exposed to other spices, such as cinnamon from the cassia tree. It then benefitted from its network of Botanical Gardens to propagate seeds and it planted these in new countries within its trading routes. This is why pepper, cloves, nutmeg, and cinnamon can be found in the West Indies today, now part of the distinctive Cajun cuisine. An enabler to this new trade were spice-grinding operations set up in the docks of London, as it was realised that ground spices were cheaper and easier to ship around the world.

Our spirit delivers no ordinary products

  • FAQ

    I've seen cold brew infusions on the market. Can I cold brew this infusion myself?
    Yes. Cold brew infusions can be wonderful = healthy and great value compared to the cold alternatives. Although the absence of heat means that the particles have less energy, are less agitated and therefore flavour / chemical infusion is a lot slower, they can often develop more complex flavours over this longer period of brewing. We always recommend starting with just a small amount of boiling water - just cover the tea or the tea bag, leave for 30 seconds and then top up with fresh, cold water and leave to develop for a day in the fridge. A spring of mint, a spoon of honey at the finish can be great. We have chosen the Hario Cold Brew Tea makers as part of our range and we recommend them highly for job.

    I’ve heard that tea contains theanine. What is it and what does it do?
    Tea does indeed contain theanine, which is an amino acid [the building blocks of proteins]. Tea is one of only a few sources of theanine. It represents about 1% of dry weight and is at its highest concentrate in shade-grown teas like matcha and gyokuro. Whilst not yet proven in scientific studies that would permit specific health claims to be made, it is believed by many to be able to reduce mental and physical stress, promote relaxation and a sense of well-being. But not only that, it is more recently being thought to aid cognitive function. It’s one explanation for tea’s famous ability to create calm in a crisis [the Great British solution to all problems – ‘putting the kettle on’] and to stimulate when a little boost is required.

  • Delivery & Returns

    UK Standard Delivery: £3.95
    UK Next Day Delivery (mainland UK only): £9.95 (Order before 12pm)
    International Delivery is available, please see our delivery page for details. For more information and Terms & Conditions, please see our Delivery page.

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