BEHIND THE CRAFT
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Tea Craft: The Different Types of Tea

It’s remarkable that so many different types of ‘cup of tea’ come from the same plant - the Camelia Sinensis.

Black and green tea are the most drunk and well known. But added to these two giants: white tea, yellow tea, purple tea, puerh tea, oolong tea, flowering teas.

The fundamental difference between these teas is how the leaf is processed – see our Stories about the different type of teas.

Within each type of tea, there are so many further variations in flavours and colours - not only because of different processing methods, but also because of the ‘terroir’ – the local natural environment. Factors include altitude, climate, soil minerals, water source, cultivation methods and not forgetting – brewing method!

FGTE12237

Spiced Citrus Green Leaf Tea Caddy 50g

Net Weight: 50g

An elegant fresh green tea with exotic natural ingredients bringing a balance of sweetness, fruit and soft spicy notes. All in a delightful Limited Edition red mini caddy from our seasonal Kaleidoscope range.

The East India Company - Lifestyle

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£14.00
This exquisitely elegant colourful green tea blend offers a round and intensive taste experience during the festive season. Special exotic ingredients to this blend brings sweet, fruity, and soft spicy notes to the fresh green tea.
Quantity

2.5 GRAMS OF TEA LEAVES | 1 TEASPOON

Temperature

200ML OF WATER AT 80ºC

Brewing Time

2-3 MINS BREWING TIME

Ingredients

Green Tea (72%), Cinnamon (8%), Sweet Orange Peel (5%), Clove (5%), Pink Pepper (5%), Sar Anise (3%), Natural Sweet Orange Flavour (1%), Natural Vanilla Flavour (1%).

Nutrition

Typical values 100g – Energy: 0kj/0kcal | Fat: 0g, of which saturates: 0g | Carbohydrate: 0g, of which sugars: 0g | Protein: 0g | Salt 0g

Storage

Store in a cool, dry place avoiding direct sunlight and strong odours.

Stories

Spice and Trade

Spices and the spice trade have been an enormous influence in global political, social, and economic developments for over 1000 years.

They were considered by those without as rare and valuable, prized for their preservative, medicinal and aromatic qualities. The East India Company realized the opportunity, but it arrived late to the game.

The Arabs in the Near-East dominated the spice trade and then the Portuguese trading in India, the Far-East and the Spice Islands [the modern-day Moluccas of Indonesia).

Of course, not all spices came from the Far-East - the Portuguese had brought chilli peppers from South America to their Indian colonies in the 16th century, which became a part of Indian cuisine and their richly spiced foods.

Captured Portuguese ships full of spice from the Spice Islands whet the appetite for the British, but it was the Dutch that made the first move, sending well-funded fleets to the Spice Islands in the 1590s, using navigational maps stolen from the Portuguese. By quickly establishing trade and being well organised and armed, the Dutch cut off the English, in the form of the East India Company, to the spice trade, who were forced to trade in the surrounding islands.
There was one nutmeg of consolation for the British. Polo Run, which was the only nutmeg-producing portion of the Spice Islands, fell into the Company’s hands from the Dutch in 1616.

The British stumbled upon the opportunity to trade in pepper in Bantam [Java], setting up a ‘factory’ [a fortified warehouse], and there was enough for all to avoid fisticuffs. The East India Company would continue to trade in pepper up to the 19th century.

When the Company arrived in India and started trading, its botanists were exposed to other spices, such as cinnamon from the cassia tree. It then benefitted from its network of Botanical Gardens to propagate seeds and it planted these in new countries within its trading routes. This is why pepper, cloves, nutmeg, and cinnamon can be found in the West Indies today, now part of the distinctive Cajun cuisine. An enabler to this new trade were spice-grinding operations set up in the docks of London, as it was realised that ground spices were cheaper and easier to ship around the world.

Our spirit delivers no ordinary products

  • FAQ

    Does green tea include caffeine and is there more or less than black tea and coffee?
    Yes it does, and it varies. All tea leaves, just like coffee, contain caffeine. Tea usually has a lower level of caffeine than coffee, which averages around 95mg for a normal cup of coffee. But it is impossible to give a precise answer, because there are so many variables at play - the length of brew time, the amount of tea used, the age of the leaf, the provenance of the leaf. Even the temperature of the water. Our best advice is to treat all tea and coffee similarly if you need to manage your caffeine intake.

    I’ve heard that tea contains theanine. What is it and what does it do?
    Tea does indeed contain theanine, which is an amino acid [the building blocks of proteins]. Tea is one of only a few sources of theanine. It represents about 1% of dry weight and is at its highest concentrate in shade-grown teas like matcha and gyokuro. Whilst not yet proven in scientific studies that would permit specific health claims to be made, it is believed by many to be able to reduce mental and physical stress, promote relaxation and a sense of well-being. But not only that, it is more recently being thought to aid cognitive function. It’s one explanation for tea’s famous ability to create calm in a crisis [the Great British solution to all problems – ‘putting the kettle on’] and to stimulate when a little boost is required.

  • Delivery & Returns

    UK Standard Delivery: £3.95
    UK Next Day Delivery (mainland UK only): £9.95 (Order before 12pm)
    International Delivery is available, please see our delivery page for details. For more information and Terms & Conditions, please see our Delivery page.

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